Advancing and Excelling as a Mid-Sized Biotech

Mid-sized biotech companies face a unique set of challenges. You’re trying to advance several programs in parallel, but you want to keep your teams small and agile to maintain your competitive and innovative edge. When you’re faced with resource constraints, or a problem you can’t address with your in-house capabilities, you need a partner that can not only keep pace with your team, but also perform at the level of scientific excellence that you demand.

 

When Jeff, the R&D director at a mid-sized biotech company, finds out that his program is threatened by negative clinical trial data, can his team demonstrate that their backup molecule is differentiated enough to continue their work before it’s too late?

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Speaker 1 (00:02) Mid-sized biotech companies face a unique set of challenges. You're trying to advance several programs in parallel, but you want to keep your teams small and agile to maintain your competitive and innovative edge. When you're faced with resource constraints, or a problem you can't address with your in-house capabilities, you need a partner that can not only keep pace with your team, but perform at the level of scientific excellence that you demand.
(00:25) Jeff is the director of immuno-oncology at a biotech with a mix of preclinical and clinical phase drugs in the pipeline. He's at a cancer research conference telling Elena, a collaborator, about how he wants to work with the most scientifically capable partners when he outsources his discovery projects. But lately that has created a situation where he's working with multiple organizations at once, meaning a lot of administrative and logistical headaches for him, and the delays are piling up.
(00:54) Jeff and Elena know that finding the right combination of scientists and resources to meet the needs of a complex drug discovery project is challenging. Getting all the teams from different organizations to interface smoothly and perform at the same level seems like an impossible proposition. Elena suggest he contact Charles River. She just came from checking out a few of their posters here at the meeting, and she knows their portfolio has all the components he needs with the requisite depth of knowledge and experience to deliver exceptional science.
(01:24) Jeff is skeptical. He doesn't believe one company can efficiently handle all the specialized services that he needs at the level of scientific rigor he demands of his team, but curious, he gives them a call anyway. He sets up an appointment with a discovery specialist in his area to meet one-on-one about his project. They discuss his needs, characterizing a back-up series for a compound that is in the clinic. Together, they define the objectives and challenges, linking each one to a Charles River capability, and brainstorming different approaches.
(01:56) Then an in vitro biologist, a DMPK specialist, a medicinal chemist, an in vivo pharmacologist, and a toxicologist sit down at the table with Jeff to discuss the science. He's introduced to his project leader, who will plan out the timelines, budget, and coordination between Charles River and his organization.
(02:16) Moving through the initial phases of the project, things go extremely smoothly. Jeff is impressed with how well the Charles River team integrates with his, and the communication is so smooth that it's hard to tell who's who when you see them working together.
(02:30) Then the team faces a big test. Jeff finds out that their company's clinical trial is stopped due to severe adverse events. He needs to understand if their back-up molecule is sufficiently differentiated from the current compound to avoid these events, and he needs preliminary information before the end of the year or there is a risk this program will be cut. He calls his project leader at Charles River, who mobilizes the team immediately. They write a study plan, including a number of in vitro assays that recapitulate the biology underlying the safety issues, and get started right away. These assays, conducted in human primary cells, show a clear differentiation from the original molecule.
(03:10) Jeff gets the green light to move forward with this project, and the Charles River team fast tracks the remaining characterization studies, then quickly transitions this molecule to an IND program.
(03:21) With the help of Charles River, Jeff and his team succeed in rescuing this program. At a future cancer research conference, when he's chatting with his former colleague, Martin, who is stressed about coordinating a big project, Jeff tells him he should give Charles River a call.
(03:37) Contact one of our consultants today by visiting www.criver.com, emailing [email protected], or calling 1-877-CRIVER-1.